Advocacy in Physical Education - Fall 2021

Course takes place from Sept. 27 - Nov. 19, 2021 (8 weeks). You must register for this course by Sept. 27, 2021.

Course takes place from Sept. 27 - Nov. 19, 2021 (8 weeks).
You must register for this course by Sept. 27, 2021

Once you register, if you wish to apply for graduate credits, you will also be sent instructions to register at Adams State University. If you are obtaining graduate credits through ASU, there is an additional associated cost of $165. There is no required textbook for this course. Please register for the graduate credits DURING the course.

This course is non-refundable, by registering you are committing to the workload of an 8 week long graduate course.

Need approval from your administration for this course? Click here

Click here to access the Syllabus.

Welcome!
We are excited about your interest in taking this graduate level course from PE Central. Below you will find a course description, the instructor's biography, and course FAQ's. This course will last 8 weeks and, if you wish, you can apply for 3 graduate credits (an additional $165) from Adams State University located in Alamosa, Colorado. Please do this during the course as opposed to waiting until the end of course. If you have any questions about the course, contact us at "[email protected]".

Mark Manross, Executive Director, PE Central


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This eight-week course is designed for K-12 teachers to learn what it means to be an effective advocate in their schools, district, community, and within their larger profession. The course will help educators better meet the professional standards in the area of advocacy practices through an understanding of current research in advocacy, professional vitality, awareness of local and national legislation, and principles of school and district wide advocacy in K-12 physical education. Through online activities, discussions, and demonstrations, participants will gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence needed to incorporate effective advocacy principles in their physical education environment.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of professional vitality through identifying two new resources that will increase their advocacy efforts in the upcoming school year.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the current research through successfully identifying (one article), reading (seven class articles), and reacting through discussion board posts.
  3. Identify a physical education policy related issue (School, District, State, or National level) that fits within advocacy model framework presented in class. Once you have identified the issue explain what specific strategies (2-3) you will take in an effort to address the issue.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to identify current national and state legislation and its potential impact on physical education at all levels as a part of your final assessment.
  5. Create a year-long social promotion physical education campaign (based on the advocacy model framework presented in class) to be implemented in your school that demonstrates your ability to successfully communicate your PE programs identified yearly theme to school administrators, faculty, parents, students, and the local community through the creation of written materials (e.g., bulletin boards/posters, newsletters, and emails) and the appropriate dissemination of this information through social media.

TEXTS, READINGS, INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES:

All Course materials (PowerPoints, articles, web links, etc.) will be uploaded in the course or available online for students to access to complete the course assignments efficiently and effectively. There is no textbook required.

Class Reading List (articles):

Jefferies, S. (2009). School boarding 101: Winning friends and influencing people. Strategies, 22(3), 35-37.

Constantinou, P. (2008). Utilizing your state AHPERD conference to increase advocacy efforts in your state. Strategies, 22(2), 36-37.

Rink, J., Templeton, J., Hewitt, P., Dawkins, M. et al. (2002). High stakes assessment in South Carolina. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 73(3), 21-24, 33.

Smith, N., & Lounsbery, M. (2009). Promoting physical education: The link to academic achievement. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 80(1), 39-43.

Beddoes, Z., Prusak, K., & Hall, A. (2014). Overcoming marginalization of physical education in America’s schools. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 85(4), 21-27.

Stewart, A. (2006). Tips for advocating: Inform your school community of the physical education of today. Strategies, 19(5) , 30-33.

Anonymous. (2011). What are the most effective and ineffective ways of advocating for physical education and physical activity? Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 82(4), 53-56.

Pennington, T. (In Review). Teaching effective advocacy skills: A model framework for PETE programs? Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

In order to receive a passing grade, the participant must complete the following course requirements:

  1. Identify two new resources that will increase your professional advocacy efforts (professional vitality) in the upcoming school year. This will be a one page two paragraph paper description of each resource and how you plan to use it.
  2. Complete seven discussion board posts, one for each of the assigned articles. Your post should be a reaction to the article, insights, possible applications, or possible disagreement with the article with an explanation. These posts should range from 7 -10 well thought out sentences.
  3. Identify an article (outside of the class reading list) that is related to PE advocacy. This will be done by identifying one current advocacy related article from the literature, reading the article, and posting the article citation along with a brief summary (7-10 sentences) to the discussion board.
  4. Identify a physical education policy related issue (School, District, State, or National level) that fits within advocacy model framework presented in class. Once you have identified the issue explain what specific strategies (2-3) you will complete in your current PE position in an effort to address the issue (three pages double spaced or less).
  5. Create a year-long social promotion physical education campaign (based on the advocacy model framework presented in class) to be implemented in your school that demonstrates your ability to successfully communicate your PE programs identified yearly theme to school administrators and faculty, parents, students, and the local community through the creation of written materials (e.g., bulletin boards/posters, newsletters, and emails) and the appropriate dissemination of this information through various identified technologies including social media.
  6. Final Assessment: At the conclusion of the course you will be given a final assessment. The final assessment will consist of 8 short essay questions.

Syllabus

Need to get this course approved by your administration and PD Coordinator? Download the course description here.


Your Instructor


Todd Pennington
Todd Pennington

Todd Pennington serves as an associate professor in Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) in the Department of Teacher Education at Brigham Young University. As a longtime educator and coach, Pennington spent time as a middle school PE teacher, head volleyball and basketball coach, before completing his graduate degrees. He teaches Advocacy in Physical Education, Elementary PE Teaching Methods for elementary education majors, Teaching Methods for Middle School PE, and is the Coordinator for PE Student Teaching and its accompanying seminar.

For the past 20 years, his focus has been promoting quality PE and physical activity through his research and teaching as a PETE professor. Specifically, his research has focused on PE teachers professional development through a variety of technology applications. Dr. Pennington was one of the creators and developers of the PE Central Web site.

In 2010 he and his co-authors received the Metzler Freedman Exemplary Paper Award within the PETE profession for their research on Systemic Success in Physical Education (SSPE). Recently, Dr. Pennington and one of his master’s students completed a follow-up study on the SSPE model focusing on the effectiveness of PE teacher’s advocacy efforts with the parents of students in the district. This study is the first of several studies to come on the use and effectiveness of advocacy principles by PE teachers.


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